Category: Attraction

Returning to a ‘normal’ office structure

And nothing screams normal like the office. The messy desks, the long commute, the last-minute requests from your boss, even those boring meetings—they all may appear oddly comforting after a year spent at home.

But beware. The return to normal might start off exciting, but you may find that the novelty is wearing off before too long. You might rediscover certain things about the 9-to-5 life that drag you down.

If that’s where you find yourself, pay attention to your response to the ‘new norm’. It may mean that your work location isn’t the problem—it’s the job itself.

That’s because it doesn’t matter whether you work from home or in an office if your career is being stifled by your job. A toxic work dynamic or disadvantageous model will drain you even if you’re working from a beach in the tropics!

So if you go back to the office and nothing changes, it may be time to find a new opportunity, one that offers…

  • Unlimited potential for income growth
  • Flexibility of time and location
  • Control over your success

So as you go back to the office, keep your eyes open. If you’re still dissatisfied with your job, consider something else. Let’s explore opportunities for you to break the mold and pursue your own path.

M.Amos 2021

Why did we start a Financial Services Firm?

Why we started our Financial Services firm?

Hi there, Reggie & Sindy Moon here. We are excited to tell our story.  The reason we wanted to tell our story right now is because so many people ask us “what do you do” or “why did you guys start selling life and health insurance” and then there is “why financial services” and we think they want a one sentence answer but there’s really not one.  We own a Real Estate Company, we’re Brokers, we’re Financial Wellness Coaches & Life Coaches, Motivational Speakers and we teach financial literacy to small business, families and even high school students the fundamentals of how money works.

Sindy was asking me to tell the story of what happened in my life when it was just me and my son around the time of the 2008 economic crash.  Well, I had a bill collector call me consistently for payment and one day I simply asked him a question.  “Do you know how many cans of soup you have in your cupboard?” I told him that the reason I was asking that question was that he was talking to a guy that has some late bills and can tell you exactly how many cans of soup I had in my cupboard.  “It’s TUESDAY and I have three cans of soup in my cupboard, and yet I don’t get paid until FRIDAY!” was my response to him. The point of that story is that’s where we were! A lot of middle America went through the same thing. You’ll hear things like their 401K turned into a 201K. Basically it’s what happened during the ‘lost decade’ and each family thought it was only happening to them at the time.  What it did to middle America still has not been fully recovered from.

Those same middle Americans are now trying to get out of the house because they are upside down in the equity and they can’t get their credit right and maybe can’t even get their income high enough to qualify for what they’re looking for now.  We all lived it and are now trying to recover.  Just remember, if you keep doing the same thing, you’ll always end up with the same results. At that point you’re not insulated against another economic downward spiral.

Does it take a millionaire to insulate themselves against a market shift, no! It takes someone that insulates themselves well enough to know that if there is a shift in the economy they are not going to be literally down to three cans of soup.  When we sell someone a house, what do we change?  We change their address!  When we show people how money works, coach them and show them the financial pain points and remind them it doesn’t have to last for a solid decade or even forever. It doesn’t have to be the middle-class-curse!

Contrasting that time in Reggie and Forest’s life is what we did this past Tuesday.   Which was that Reggie went to the mall and bought an entirely new Winter wardrobe with tailored suit and ties, the works.  Sindy was sitting at the home office working in pajamas while Reggie was out buying a new suit.  The only concern at this point was Atlanta traffic for Reggie and for Sindy, it was whether to have that second cup of coffee in her pajamas or not.

So, what we do is assist families and small businesses reach Financial Freedom!

Financial Freedom is not only owning a fancy car or private jet but it actually means that you can go get what you need and get it when you need it.  That is what we do.  That is why we do what we do and are thrilled to be in this business …. The MONEY business!

What is this “Good” Friday and how does it apply to me?

What IS “Good” Friday?

What is Good Friday and why do we call Good Friday “good,” when it is such a dark and bleak event commemorating a day of suffering and death for Jesus?

Why is it called “Good” Friday?

For Christians, Good Friday is a crucial day of the year because it celebrates what we believe to be the most momentous weekend in the history of the world. Ever since Jesus died and was raised, Christians have proclaimed the cross and resurrection of Jesus to be the decisive turning point for all creation. Paul considered it to be “of first importance” that Jesus died for our sins, was buried, and was raised to life on the third day, all in accordance with what God had promised all along in the Scriptures (1 Corinthians 15:3).

On Good Friday we remember the day Jesus willingly suffered and died by crucifixion as the ultimate sacrifice for our sins (1 John 1:10). It is followed by Easter, the glorious celebration of the day Jesus was raised from the dead, heralding his victory over sin and death and pointing ahead to a future resurrection for all who are united to him by faith (Romans 6:5).

What is so “Good” about it?

Still, why call the day of Jesus’ death “Good Friday” instead of “Bad Friday” or something similar? Some Christian traditions do take this approach: in German, for example, the day is called Karfreitag, or “Sorrowful Friday.” In English, in fact, the origin of the term “Good” is debated: some believe it developed from an older name, “God’s Friday.” Regardless of the origin, the name Good Friday is entirely appropriate because the suffering and death of Jesus, as terrible as it was, marked the dramatic culmination of God’s plan to save his people from their sins.

In order for the good news of the gospel to have meaning for us, we first have to understand the bad news of our condition as sinful people under condemnation. The good news of deliverance only makes sense once we see how we are enslaved. Another way of saying this is that it is important to understand and distinguish between law and gospel in Scripture. We need the law first to show us how hopeless our condition is; then the gospel of Jesus’ grace comes and brings us relief and salvation.

In the same way, Good Friday is “good” because as terrible as that day was, it had to happen for us to receive the joy of Easter. The wrath of God against sin had to be poured out on Jesus, the perfect sacrificial substitute, in order for forgiveness and salvation to be poured out to the nations. Without that awful day of suffering, sorrow, and shed blood at the cross, God could not be both “just and the justifier” of those who trust in Jesus (Romans 3:26). Paradoxically, the day that seemed to be the greatest triumph of evil was actually the deathblow in God’s gloriously good plan to redeem the world from bondage.

The cross is where we see the convergence of great suffering and God’s forgiveness. Psalms 85:10 sings of a day when “righteousness and peace” will “kiss each other.” The cross of Jesus is where that occurred, where God’s demands, his righteousness, coincided with his mercy. We receive divine forgiveness, mercy, and peace because Jesus willingly took our divine punishment, the result of God’s righteousness against sin. “For the joy set before him” (Hebrews 12:2) Jesus endured the cross on Good Friday, knowing it led to his resurrection, our salvation, and the beginning of God’s reign of righteousness and peace.

Good Friday marks the day when wrath and mercy met at the cross. That’s why Good Friday is so dark and so Good

Good Friday verses.  

Romans 5:6-10 – “You see, at just the right time, when we were still powerless, Christ died for the ungodly. Very rarely

will anyone die for a righteous person, though for a good person someone might possibly dare to die. But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us. Since we have now been justified by his blood, how much more shall we be saved from God’s wrath through him! For if, while we were God’s enemies, we were reconciled to him through the death of his Son, how much more, having been reconciled, shall we be saved through his life!”

1 Peter 2:24 – “He himself bore our sins” in his body on the cross, so that we might die to sins and live for righteousness; “by his wounds you have been healed.”

Isaiah 53:3-5 – “He was despised and rejected by mankind, a man of suffering, and familiar with pain. Like one from whom people hide their faces he was despised, and we held him in low esteem. Surely he took up our pain and bore our suffering, yet we considered him punished by God, stricken by him, and afflicted. But he was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was on him, and by his wounds we are healed.”

The Crucifixion and Death of Jesus Our Christ. 

Matthew 27 –  45 From noon until three in the afternoon darkness came over all the land. 46 About three in the afternoon Jesus cried out in a loud voice, “Eli, Eli,c] lema sabachthani?” (which means “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”).d]

47 When some of those standing there heard this, they said, “He’s calling Elijah.”

48 Immediately one of them ran and got a sponge. He filled it with wine vinegar, put it on a staff, and offered it to Jesus to drink. 49 The rest said, “Now leave him alone. Let’s see if Elijah comes to save him.”

50 And when Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit.

51 At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. The earth shook, the rocks split 52 and the tombs broke open. The bodies of many holy people who had died were raised to life. 53 They came out of the tombs after Jesus’ resurrection ande] went into the holy city and appeared to many people.

54 When the centurion and those with him who were guarding Jesus saw the earthquake and all that had happened, they were terrified, and exclaimed, “Surely he was the Son of God!”

Enjoy, celebrate and remember your Good Friday!

Palm Sunday, beginning of new Easter traditions