Are Annuities Taxable?

The answer is complicated (but generally, yes they are)

Let’s assume that you have already done your research on the workings of an Annuity and you are almost convinced that it is a good investment for you and your future plans.  Now, let’s consider if the taxability of this product is what you are looking for.

First, if you purchase an annuity with pre-tax dollars, payments from the annuity are fully taxable as income. But, if you buy an annuity with after-tax funds, you are required to pay taxes only on the earnings (ie, profit).  Annuities offer tax-deferred growth, which means taxes on annuities are not due until you withdraw money from the annuity.  One of the main tax advantages of annuities is they allow investments to grow tax-free until the funds are withdrawn.  This includes dividends, interest and capital gains, all of which may be fully reinvested while they remain in the annuity.  This allows your investment to grow without being reduced by tax payments.

But this seemingly simple perk is accompanied by a raft of complicated rules about what funds are taxed, how they are taxed and when they are taxed.

Because of the complexity, it is best to consult with a tax professional when purchasing an annuity and before withdrawing any funds.

Are Annuities Taxable?

Annuities are tax deferred.  But that does not mean they are a way to avoid taxes completely.  What this means is taxes are not due until you receive income payments from your annuity.  Withdrawals and lump sum distributions from an annuity are taxed as ordinary income.  They do not receive the benefit of being taxed as capital gains.

How are Annuities Taxed?

When it comes to taxes, the most important piece of information about your annuity is whether it is held in a qualified or non-qualified account. Remember, qualified is that the taxes are behind the tax wall and are allowed by IRS to be deferred.  Non-qualified means that the taxes have already been paid. In this case, the earnings (or profits) are taxable.

Qualified Annuity Taxation

If an annuity is funded with money on which no taxes have been previously paid, then it is considered a qualified annuity.  Typically, these annuities are funded with money from 401ks or other tax-deferred retirement accounts, such as IRAs.

When you receive payments from a qualified annuity, those payments are fully taxable as income.  That is because no taxes have been paid on that money.

But annuities purchased with a Roth IRA or Roth 401k are completely tax free if certain requirements are met.

Non-Qualified Annuity Taxation

If the annuity was purchased with after-tax funds, then it is non-qualifed.  Non-qualifed annuities require tax payments on only the earnings (or profits).

The amount of taxes on non-qualifed annuities is determined by something called the exclusion ratio.  The exclusion ratio is used to determine what percentage of annuity income payments is taxable and which is not.  The idea is to determine the amount of a withdrawal or payment from an annuity is from the already-taxed principal and how much is considered taxable earnings.

The exclusion ratio involves the principal that was used to purchase the annuity, the amount of time the annuity has existed and the interest earnings.

If an annuitant lives longer than his or her actuarial life expectancy, any annuity payments received after that age are fully taxable.

That is because the exclusion ratio is calculated to spread principal withdrawals over the annuitant’s life expectancy.  Once all the principal has been accounted for, any remaining income payments or withdrawals are considered to be from earnings.

Exclusion Ratio Example

  • Your life expectancy is 10 years at retirement.
  • You have an annuity purchased for $40,000 with after-tax money.
  • Annual payments of $4,000 – 10 percent of your original investment – is non-taxable.
  • You live longer than 10 years.
  • The money you receive beyond that 10-year-life expectation will be taxed as income.

Annuity Withdrawal Taxation

How and when you withdraw funds from your annuity also affects your tax bill.

In general, if you take money out of your annuity before your turn 59 ½, you may owe a 10 percent penalty on the taxable portion of the withdrawal.

After that age, if you take your withdrawal as a lump sum, you have to pay income taxes that year on the entire taxable portion of the funds.  If money is left in your annuity account, the IRS considers the first and subsequent withdrawals to be interest and subject to taxes.

Annuity Payout Taxation

According to the General Rule for Pensions and Annuities by the Internal Revenue Service as a general rule each monthly annuity income payment from a non-qualified plan is made up of two parts.  The tax-free part is considered the return of your net cost for purchasing the annuity.  The rest is the taxable balance, or the earnings.

When you receive income payments from your annuity, as opposed to withdrawals, the idea is to evenly divide the principal amount – and its tax exclusions – out over the expected number of payments. The rest of the amount in each payment is considered earnings subject to income taxes.

Inherited Annuity Taxation

If you are the beneficiary and inherit an annuity, the same tax rules apply.  The main rule about taxation with an inherited annuity or one that is purchased is that any principal that is funded with money that was already subject to taxes will not be taxed.  Principal that was not taxed and earnings will be subject to taxation as income.  The amount of previously taxed principal included in each annuity income payment is considered excluded from federal income tax requirements.  This is known as the exclusion amount.

In Summary

If you just take the opinion of Mom, Dad, Gramma, Uncle Joe, Preacher Mike, Mr. Ramsey, Mr. Howard or even simply the Web then you are not making the best, most educated decision.  Do your due diligence and ensure that you talk to an industry professional.  What happens if Uncle Joe tells you what happened to him 30 years ago and you should “never invest in one of those annuity things”. Well, first of all what is his profession and how old was the product he purchased at that time.  Could things have changed in those years?  How about being at a family reunion and Gramma tells you that she just heard Mr. Howard talking about how some people lost money when they annuities a few years ago.  Even though you love Gramma, is she a financial professional with current experience and education.  So, in summary, annuities can be taxable in the right situation.  This is definitely something that you need to have reviewed by your Financial Professional.  Best of luck on your investment.

Why Eclipse Financial Services

Eclipse Financial Services

Hi, my name is Reggie Moon.  My wife Sindy and I own a Real Estate Company on the Southside of Atlanta, Georgia.  Three years ago we added financial services to what we do for a very simple reason. Two out of one hundred people are going to buy a house this year, two! Out of those same one hundred people there are eighty five of them that are in for the biggest financial train wreck that has been seen for generations. So if you are in the business of helping people like we are, would it be better to JUST change folks address or change their financial trajectory?  I go with the latter.

Then who are going align with to help folks?    An entrepreneur that has done it maybe NEVER or one that has built not just one but two multi-billion-dollar market-cap financial services companies. We aligned with Hubert Humphrey with Hegemon Group International.    He originally built Primerica Financial Services and World Financial Group.  So if you are going to align with someone then why not go with someone who has already successfully done it.

If you do more than just change a family’s address then give me a call to discuss.  Reggie Moon, Eclipse USA Realty and Eclipse Financial Services.

Call or click 404-Eclipse(325-4773) www.404Eclipse.com

 

 

 

Master Your Money or It Will Master You!

People make several mistakes when saving and investing for retirement, and one of the biggest ones is not getting started because they think they need a large sum of money to begin, says Tony Robbins, 54, an inspirational speaker and best-selling author.

 

Some folks think investing and personal finance are so complex that they “never take the time to figure it out,” he says.  His goal with the new book is to “help the average person to cut through all the complexity and all the mythology that is sold to us about how you really can’t manage your own finances, and show them that the best people on earth have given them the guideposts and the steps to go from wherever they are financially to where they truly want to be.”

But his advice isn’t guaranteed to make you money. Even professional investors took different paths to their fortunes.

 

After researching the new book, Robbins developed what he calls the seven steps to financial freedom. Those are:

 

Step 1. Make the decision to become an investor, not a consumer. “You don’t want to own an Apple phone, you want to own Apple,” he says.

You have to commit a certain percentage of your income to savings for your financial freedom. Whatever that number is — 10%, 15% — stick to it in good times and bad. Have it taken automatically from your paycheck and put directly into a retirement or savings account.

 

Step 2. Become an insider on investing. Know the rules of the game. Understand mutual funds and learn what mutual funds beat the market or their benchmark over any 10-year period. Look into the fees you are paying on mutual funds and how that affects your financial future.

He says people also don’t read the fine print on their investments so they don’t realize what fees they are paying. Just like there is compounding growth, there are compounding costs, he says.

If you are only paying 1% in fees, you will probably end up with a lot more in your final nest egg than if you are paying 3% in fees, he says.

He points out that if you had a $100,000 investment and were lucky enough to get 7% annually, paying 1% in fees, you’d have about $574,000 after 30 years. If you paid 3% in fees, you’d only have about $324,000.

“What you don’t know will hurt you in the financial world. But once you know these things, you’ll be able to take advantage of the system instead of having the system take advantage of you.”

 

Step 3. Make the game winnable. “Most people have a number that’s so big that they never begin the journey,” Robbins says. Figure out how much money you need for financial security and financial independence. Calculate this and come up with a plan. Look for places you can save more.

 

Step 4. Evaluate your asset allocation. “You have to create a bucket list. You have to learn where to put your money to keep it safe and where to put your money to grow it with some risk,” he says. Put your money in different types of investments, such as stocks, bonds, commodities or real estate. Diversify your investments.

 

Step 5. Create a lifetime income plan. Make sure you won’t run out of income for as long as you live. “Income is all that matters. Assets won’t buy your food. They won’t let you travel. You have to focus on income. The investment community wants you to think about keeping your money in assets.”

 

Step 6. Invest like the .001%. “That means learn from the very best on earth (Schwab, Icahn, Bogle, Dalio, Forbes and others he interviewed for the book), and what you learn from them apply and you’ll achieve financial security faster than you will any other way.”

 

Step 7. Just do it, enjoy it and share it. Make a commitment to be wealthy now, not in the future. “Start where you are, and you’ll begin to find out that there’s more than enough.”

Robbins advises people to educate themselves in investing. It’s worth the time, and it’ll pay off. “You master money, or it masters you,” he says.

Based on article written by:

Nanci Hellmick

USA Today

Referencing book written by:

Anthony Robbins

Money: Master The Game

How much does a business start-up cost?

If you were going to start your very own business today, what would you start? What would you do? Would you provide a service? Would you sell a product? And what would your role be in the business? Now, ask yourself how much it would cost to actually start your business. How much would it cost to let people know you started your business? How long would it take before folks starting either buying your product or using your services? And then what would your overhead costs be? Then you have to start thinking about licensing costs and taxes to pay.

If it’s your first business, estimating start-up costs is uncharted terrain for you – and that can be completely terrifying.  Luckily, there are lots of resources out there for brand-new business owners.  The best way to estimate your business start-up costs is by drafting a business plan.  Keep in mind many of the start-up costs may be recurring, so you’ll need to keep paying them over and over again, either on a monthly, quarterly or annual basis:  rent, office supplies and payroll.

Additionally, when calculating your business start-up costs, a good rule of thumb is to be able to cover six months’ worth of expenses up front.  So don’t count on your businesses’ revenue to start easing your costs until after that early period is over.  You’ll want a cushion while you get your feet under you and work on attracting business.

*Start-up Expense                                                Estimated Cost

Equipment                                                            $10,000-$125,000

Incorporation Fees                                               Under $300

Office Space                                                          $100-$1,000 per/ee per/mo

Inventory                                                               $17-25% of total budget

Marketing                                                              0-10% of total budget

Website                                                                  About $40 per/mo

Office Furniture & Supplies                                10% of total budget

Utilities                                                                   About $2 per/sq ft of total office space

Payroll                                                                   25-50% of total budget

Professional Consultants                                   $1,000-$5,000 per year

Insurance                                                              An aver of $1,200 per year

Taxes                                                                    Variable, but 21% corporate rate

Travel                                                                   Variable

Shipping                                                              Variable

*Reported SBA 2018

Now that you’ve had a chance to begin the mental exercise, let’s actually consider a much lower cost and highly effective option. What if you could just partner with someone who is actually doing what it is that you’d like to do? What would the cost be involved and how much time would it take.

With all of that in mind …………….. here is an option to strongly consider.  Work with us, start making money and begin building your future. You then will be able to start building your very own dream business and not be in tremendous debt just starting out!  You never know, you might actually find you enjoy what we do a lot more than you think!

Let’s talk soon.

404-Eclipse (325-4773)

404Eclipse.com